Zazzle Media » Blogs http://www.zazzlemedia.co.uk We are a content and data led Content marketing, SEO consulting and social media agency Mon, 26 Jan 2015 12:15:54 +0000 en-US hourly 1 http://wordpress.org/?v=4.1 10 Ways to Drive Revenue with Your Digital Strategy in 2015 http://www.zazzlemedia.co.uk/blog/drive-revenue-digital-strategy/ http://www.zazzlemedia.co.uk/blog/drive-revenue-digital-strategy/#comments Fri, 23 Jan 2015 09:04:40 +0000 http://www.zazzlemedia.co.uk/?post_type=blog&p=6139 These days everyone knows about digital, regardless of whether they work in the world of marketing. When I first started at Zazzle and people asked me what I did, I’d say: ‘I work in digital marketing’. Response: blank stare and confusion. I soon learnt the easiest way to answer this question was by saying, ‘we […]

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These days everyone knows about digital, regardless of whether they work in the world of marketing. When I first started at Zazzle and people asked me what I did, I’d say: ‘I work in digital marketing’. Response: blank stare and confusion. I soon learnt the easiest way to answer this question was by saying, ‘we try and get people to the top of Google’.

But while people had a level of understanding as soon as I mentioned ‘Google’, they still didn’t totally get it. Now, two years and four months on, my answer gets a completely different response. As well as people knowing ‘Google’, they now consciously throw the words ‘Twitter’, ‘Facebook’, ‘Blogs’ and ‘Content’ into our conversation mix.

Conclusion: the power, growth and influence of digital marketing is undeniable.

So it’s no surprise that businesses are trying to incorporate it into their marketing strategies in any way they can. It’s now become one of the most effective ways to not only make your business survive, but also to make it money – if properly executed.

Here are ten ways of using a digital strategy to drive revenue in 2015.

ON PAGE STRATEGY

Before diving into the world of off page, it’s critical that the home of your company is given enough love and attention; we’re talking, of course, about your website.

Let’s face it, while we can work on increasing the number of visitors to your site, it’s not going to be worthwhile if people come to it, can’t find what they’re looking for, completely lose interest and click off feeling frustrated. It’s an opportunity lost.

So, take a good look at your site as it currently stands and devote time to review whether these three points are covered off properly:

1. Make sure your on site content is optimised well

As well as it being vital for users to understand what your website is about, what you do and the services you provide – from the moment they land on the homepage – it’s even more important that search engines are able to understand all of these elements, too.
The content on your site provides search engines with essential data that they then use to position you accordingly in search results, should you display it correctly for relevant keyword terms or phrases.

Ultimately, if your site’s content is optimised down to a tee and Google is able to understand every single element and why it’s there, you’re more likely to appear higher up in the rankings than if you let it fall by the wayside.

Better keyword rankings equal higher search engine visibility, which equals more visits, resulting in a higher potential for leads, conversions and sales, which all-in-all, in case you hadn’t guessed by now, ultimately means more revenue.

Make sure your Meta is meticulous, tag your images with alt tags, move that all-important introductory text above the fold, and you’ll be on your way to being in Google’s good books to make sure you have a better chance of succeeding in all the above.

2. Blog, regularly

If you haven’t got a blog on your website yet, it’s time to get one. And if already do have one, it’s time to make the most of it.

At Zazzle, we’re big fans of blogs and always recommend them to our clients as must-have. They’re one of the most valuable ways to capitalise on long tail search opportunities to improve your ROI.

These days in SEO, it’s not just all about ranking well for those all-important trophy keywords. Yes, of course you still want to aim high with them, but as Google has evolved and become smarter over time, it’s now all about thinking outside the box.

Whenever you head to Google in search of something, there’s always an intention behind it – we turn to search engines to get answers, information, resources and reviews on the very thing we’re searching for. It’s these user intents that Google is working with to become much smarter at through their algorithm, Hummingbird.

As Search Engine Land summarises, Hummingbird is about paying, ‘more attention to each word in a query, ensuring that the whole query — the whole sentence, conversation or meaning — is taken into account, rather than particular words. The goal is that pages match the meaning do better, rather than pages matching just a few words.’

This is exactly where blogs come into play – they’re the perfect way to satisfy user intent.

Look at what long tail keywords and phrases people are searching for and work to create articles around these subject matters that will help to answer their queries accordingly.

In depth content crafted this way is more likely to connect with a user than content which only makes a passing reference to what they’re looking for. As your content will be of much more value to them, doing this will help to increase conversions and click-throughs further down the line. It will also help to establish your brand as a trustworthy and reliable source of content that your audience can rely on, particularly if you post regularly.

3. Invest in and improve your CRO

If you read a previous post The Psychology of Colour for Selling Online, then you may already be aware of this next tip. However, if you didn’t and you’re feeling a little lost with what I’m talking about, Conversion Rate Optimisation (CRO) was featured within this as the method of creating a better experience for a landing page visitor. The end goal is to increase the percentage of visitors who convert into customers.

Whilst the practice of CRO is extensive and there are lots of tips and tricks you can try, there are some very small changes you can make to your website that can make big changes to your conversions.

For example, look at using red shades on call-to-action buttons to make them stand out.
A CRO study carried out by dmix looked into making subtle changes to their call-to-action buttons to determine which colour, red or green, resulted in higher conversions to sign-ups. The result? Changing it from green to red increased conversation rate by 21%. It’s definitely worth a try. If you want to take your CRO to the next level and see what wonders it can do for you, check out Moz’s Definitive How-To Guide for Conversion Rate Optimisation, which you can find, here.

OFF PAGE STRATEGY

A big part of any digital marketing strategy lies with ensuring your brand’s off page capabilities are refined as well as they are on page – after all, whilst the first three points will help to improve your chances of conversion once people land on your site, you need to get these people to your website in the first place.

No people, no conversions, no revenue.

Here are five more tips that will certainly be able to help on that front:

4. Create a content strategy

This snippet from SAP really hit the nail on the head as to why a content strategy is a must-have for driving revenue:

“Because customers have a wealth of choices in an omnichannel digital world, you must cut through the noise by delivering the best customer-experience.”

You need to stand out from the crowd so that people choose to invest in and buy from you, rather than from your competitors. So prepare to become best friends with data, because it’s the only certified way to make sure the content you produce is exactly what people are looking for.

Dive into Keyword Planner and research which keywords and phrases in your niche have the biggest search volumes. Use tools such as Buzz Sumo to see what content has worked well and has been shared the most, and Bottlenose to see what topics and trends are most being talked about.

Marry these together and you’ll be on your way to coming up with content you know has the best chance of being successful. What’s more, covering these bases will once again help to make sure you’re fulfilling that all-important user intent.

Once you’ve got all the data to get your creative juices flowing, the next thing you must think about is who would be most be interested in the piece of content. This question is vital in delivering that personalised service. You can categorise your target audience into persona groups. Think carefully about the people you want to target; do this well, and you’ll see a greater ROI down the line.

As our Content Marketing Executive, Jade, touched upon in her blog post, you can often cover this off with three or four main personas.

As personas categorise typical web users, they allow us to think about how the individuals we are targeting would use our content and how they would benefit from it accordingly.

When creating a typical persona, you should consider the following:

  • Name
  • Age
  • Gender
  • Their appearance
  • Occupation
  • Marital status
  • Where they live
  • Character
  • Site usage
  • Brands they identify with
  • What they like to do in their spare time
  • Hobbies

For example, if you were a bridal company looking to promote your services, you may consider reaching out to the following personas:

persona2

persona1

Nailing down a content strategy and the personas is the most successful way to ensure your content not only gets seen and read by the right people, but also that it has the most impact with them when they do – if they like it, they’re more likely to engage with it, and if they engage with it, they’re more likely to buy into it.

How to go about actually pulling a content strategy together? On to the next tip…

5. The Zazzle Ideation Process

Here you’ll find a few steps to work through to help ensure you’ve got everything covered – and as we use it here at Zazzle Media, it’s 100% tried and tested.

6. Plot a clear and concise content calendar

Once you’ve gathered all your content ideas together and got your personas finalised, you need to organise them. To increase conversion rates and revenue you need to target your content, at the right people, at the right time.

The best way to do this is through a content calendar; it will really help to plan the output of your content so you’re doing exactly that. As Zazzle MD Simon mentioned in his Moz post, The Ultimate Guide to Content Planning, the production of your content needs to move in ebbs and flows, with a mixture of ‘big bang’ pieces being created as well as smaller regular content ideas.

Here, we consider ‘big bang’ pieces as more interactive pieces which are generated to maximise the potential of getting shared not only socially, but also from a link perspective.
These ideas are created less frequently, with one or two pieces created and rolled out over the course of a year. The smaller content ideas tend to be your top 10 and how-to article-based pieces that are created for quick reading and placed on smaller blogs and websites.

Not only will planning these ideas into a calendar help to get you organised, it will also help to ensure you’re catering for all of your different personas by making sure you’ve got a mix of different types. As I touched upon in The Importance of Different Content Types in Content Strategy, they’re all going to have different ways of engaging with and taking your content in.

If you want your content to have the best possible chance of making a user convert to help increase your revenues, you have to think of every type of learning style:

Visual > Visual learners best absorb information in picture, image, map, colour and diagram format.

Aural > Aural learners prefer to work with sounds and rhythm to learn and understand.

Logical > Logical learners retain information by using logic and by applying patterns to organise data.

Social > Social learners learn better in groups, bouncing off others and sharing ideas within a team.

Solitary > Solitary learners like ‘alone time’ to think through new information and process in a deeper way.

Verbal > Verbal learners process information by verbalising data; for example, reading out notes to process and retain information.

Physical > Physical learners are very much hands-on people.

When you’re plotting your ideas into your content calendar, think about your personas, how you can accommodate their different learning styles and how you can use different content types to reach out to them more successfully.

To help you do this, I’ve summarised content types by different learning styles in the handy table below: 

learning

7. Find the perfect balance of placement sites

Once you’ve decided on the content you’re going to create, the next thing to decide is where it’s going to go; after all, as highlighted earlier, you need to get out there to get more people, and more money, coming in.
There are two types of placement sites you need to keep in mind.

The first of these are, big, well-known media sites. If you’re looking to drive more traffic to your website to increase those all-important conversions and revenues, then you need to get your content placed on a website that also has high volumes of traffic. The chances of your content being seen increases, which in turn increases the chances of them visiting your site and increases the potential for them to convert if they like what they see.

Without access to their Google Analytics data, how do you find out if a website has high traffic or not?

Well, there’s a ranking system set by Alexa.com that audits and makes public the frequency of visits on various websites. It then calculates a traffic ranking based on the amount of traffic recorded from users that have the Alexa toolbar installed over a period of three months. The lower the ranking a site has, the higher traffic it receives.

But while these are very important for pushing you out into the online world, the smaller mid-level blogs must not be ignored. Don’t discount a site if it doesn’t have an impressive Alexa ranking; check their PR, DA, CF and TF first before you write it off completely. Because if the blog is relevant to what you do and what your content piece is about and it has technically good metrics, it’s still a good host for your content – these blogs will still contribute to driving link equity into your domain to increase the power of it accordingly. Keep building this up and you’ll start to improve your online search visibility too.

The key to driving more revenue through the placements you source for your content lies with finding the right balance between those sites which drive traffic and brand awareness and those that also drive technical equity into your website’s domain; Google likes a natural balance of the two, and you’ll be rewarded for it accordingly.

SOCIAL MEDIA STRATEGY

No digital marketing strategy is complete without a mention of social media; apart from being the handy tool that allows us to keep in touch with our friends and occasionally check what they’re up to, it’s also perfect for helping you drive revenue for your business. It fuels key areas of the purchase funnel, increases awareness, activates interest and desire, and most importantly, prompts action to purchase – if you implement practices properly.

8. Link your content strategy with your social strategy

After you’ve spent all that time creating a comprehensive content strategy, don’t just limit to using it on content-only work. All that data you collated, all the insight you put into your personas and all that understanding into their learning styles and the content types that resonate with them the most can all be transferred straight over to your social strategy too.

Test different post types and measure which ones result in more engagement. Use a content-style social calendar to plot how you’ll use these findings to make your pages even more successful.

9. Don’t be afraid of investing in advertising

It’s not uncommon for people, especially clients, to be unsure about incorporating social media advertising into their digital strategies. Quite often we hear, ‘but I want my competition, post or idea to do well organically before I invest in paid ads’.

Of course, while the best measure of success is something flying off its own back, there’s nothing wrong with giving it a little helping hand to get there. These days, social advertising is a great way to extend the reach of your page, platforms and posts, and by doing so, your brand and company – as covered off here.

10. Follow by example

There’s nothing wrong in following by example. There are a plethora of companies out there who have honed their social strategies to drive more revenue.

Think about your favourite brands and how they enticed you in, and take some time to research how they did it – a bit of competitor analysis never did anyone any harm, and it’s a great way to learn what’s worked in the past and maybe what didn’t.
If you’re into fashion, you might find this case study insightful – here, Media Measurement looks at five social strategies that drove revenue during London Fashion Week. Enjoy!

My 10 Takeaways

ON PAGE
1. Make sure your on site content is optimised well
2. Blog, regularly
3.Invest in and improve your CRO

OFF PAGE
4. Create a content strategy
5. The Zazzle Ideation Process can help
6. Plot your content strategy ideas into a concise content calendar
7. Find the perfect balance of placement sites

SOCIAL
8. Link up your content strategy with your social strategy
9. Don’t be afraid of investing in advertising
10. Follow by example

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The Man Behind Content Marketing > An Interview with Joe Pulizzi http://www.zazzlemedia.co.uk/blog/joe-pulizzi-interview/ http://www.zazzlemedia.co.uk/blog/joe-pulizzi-interview/#comments Thu, 15 Jan 2015 09:59:02 +0000 http://www.zazzlemedia.co.uk/?post_type=blog&p=6130 Think content marketing and one name springs to mind: Joe Pulizzi. Indeed, while some may think of content marketing as a relatively recent discipline Joe began using the term as far back as 2001. The founder of the Content Marketing Institute, Joe is the writer of Epic Content Marketing and the man behind the massively […]

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Think content marketing and one name springs to mind: Joe Pulizzi. Indeed, while some may think of content marketing as a relatively recent discipline Joe began using the term as far back as 2001.

The founder of the Content Marketing Institute, Joe is the writer of Epic Content Marketing and the man behind the massively successful Content Marketing World event, which takes place in Ohio every September.

His awards and accolades include an Ernst and Young 2014 Entrepreneur of the Year finalist and the 2014 John Caldwell Lifetime Achievement Award from the Content Council.

Joe kindly gave up some of his time over the busy Christmas period to speak about current work, future trends, and perhaps the greatest entrepreneur in US history…

Describe your role in one sentence.

Getting more organizations around the world to build their own audiences instead of having to rent them from other places.

Could you tell us a little bit about what you’re working on at the moment?

I’m currently working on the agenda for Content Marketing World 2015, and writing a new book called Content Inc, targeted to entrepreneurs on how to launch a company by building an audience first and launching the product second.

What’s the best thing about your job, and what are the most frustrating things?

The best thing is bring able to positively affect so many people around the world, and working with the most amazing team on the planet.

The most frustrating part? I travel a lot… probably more than I’d like to.

What’s the best piece of work you have created digitally and why?

I love the audio work we are doing right now, from the audio version of Epic Content Marketing, to my weekly podcast, This Old Marketing, with Robert Rose, to the launch of my new podcast, Content Inc.

I think podcasting is going to be huge over the next few years as technology barriers continue to fall. I’m amazed by the types of relationships we are building through audio marketing.

Who do you look up to as an influential figure in your career and why?

My former boss, Jim McDermott. Not only did he give me my first big break, he really drove my current obsession with strategy and process.

I don’t launch anything today without some kind of roadmap. Jim is responsible for that.

What is the difference, in your opinion, between those entrepreneurs who ‘make it’, and those that don’t?

Patience and vision.

First, many of the entrepreneurs that didn’t make it just didn’t have the patience to stick through the early years. It takes time to build a growing business and many people just can’t wait long enough for the tide to turn.

Second, too many entrepreneurs think too small. Think small goals, get small results.

What is your biggest regret or missed opportunity you have experienced?

No regrets… but… I wish I would have started building our subscriber base earlier. The first few years of content creation I wasn’t focused enough on building an audience. That, and I wish I would have bought Apple stock in the early 90s.

Which three people would you have dinner with and why?

Warren Buffett: I’d love to pick his brain for an hour.  Plus, he seems like a super nice guy.

Louis C.K:  I’m totally fascinated by his path to success.

Ben Franklin: Talk about an entrepreneur…maybe the greatest in US history.

What was the last/best book you read? Where do you go to for inspiration?

I just reread Stranger in a Strange Land… my favourite science fiction book of all time. There is a section in that book on focus, which is the best example of focus I’ve ever seen. You’ll have to read it.

For inspiration, I spend time with my kids or go on long runs.

What’s your proudest achievement to date?

My two boys… but that’s probably not what you are looking for.

Maybe the fact that we were able to create the largest content marketing event on the planet, bring it to Cleveland, Ohio, and do so out of a small home office and a virtual staff around the country.

What 3 things do you still want to achieve in your career?

1) NY Times best-selling book.

2) Travel the world with my wife.

3) Start a nonprofit that can help US autistic children get the speech therapy they need to live the amazing lives they should be able to live.

What advice would you give yourself, if you had to start your career all over again?

Start helping others earlier in life. For so long I focused on my own goals, which is fine… but you get much further by helping others accomplish their goals.

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14 Digital Marketing New Year’s Resolutions for 2015 http://www.zazzlemedia.co.uk/blog/digital-marketing-2015-plans/ http://www.zazzlemedia.co.uk/blog/digital-marketing-2015-plans/#comments Thu, 08 Jan 2015 14:05:31 +0000 http://www.zazzlemedia.co.uk/?post_type=blog&p=6109 It’s that time of year again; where we all promise to radically change our lifestyle and more than likely vow to get fit, stop smoking, eat less chocolate etc. You only need to look around to see that the usual resolutions are undoubtedly underway in your workplace and at home. Of course, these resolutions don’t […]

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It’s that time of year again; where we all promise to radically change our lifestyle and more than likely vow to get fit, stop smoking, eat less chocolate etc. You only need to look around to see that the usual resolutions are undoubtedly underway in your workplace and at home.

Of course, these resolutions don’t tend to last too long, as that Friday post-work beer proves to be too damn tempting and the gym membership card is lost at the bottom of your bag.

But remember, resolutions are essentially about improvement and what better place to apply this ethos than in your digital team? Your 2015 digital resolutions are critical and the temptation offered by that Yorkie on the shelf simply cannot apply to your resolutions for digital… it’s cutthroat out there; you need to set your strategies and really stick to them.

Buzzwords are a big thing. In fact, ‘buzzword’ is probably the biggest buzzword around. ‘Reem’ and ‘well jel’ have thankfully subsided somewhat from society (or maybe I just don’t pay attention to anyone who says them anymore), however some buzzwords are buzzwords for good reason and I’m going to throw some your way right now – it’s no coincidence that they also form the sub-headings for this post!

This New Year, think about all of these buzzwords when formulating and developing your 2015 digital strategies…

Mobile
Local
Content
Long tail
Security

Mobile

1. Importance of responsive design:

Site design has come a long way, especially in the last couple of years with features such as infinite scroll, flat design and parallax coming to the fore. These features are of course user-focused, but as digital marketers we need to look beyond this and think about what Google sees too.

In 2013, Matt Cutts said that responsive design wouldn’t hurt your SEO but this has moved forward even more since then and it can now give you tangible benefit.

Not only is mobile usage still increasing, meaning it is imperative that your site works well on phones and tablets to generate maximum on-site engagement and ultimately conversions, but it now has a search benefit too. Google has begun to label mobile-friendly sites in the SERPs themselves, so not only can you engage users better once they are on the site, you can get more visitors to visit via the click-through benefit of being labeled ‘mobile-friendly’.

The example below shows search results for the ‘Get The Label’ fashion brand. As you can see, Google has highlighted the mobile-friendly nature of the site, inevitably encouraging click-throughs from users…

ml-post

We also now know that getting this mobile-friendly label could even help you rank better, which is always a plus!

Google’s mobile recommendations are of course wider than just responsive design…

2. Be aware that mobile search results are changing

As mobile technology like GPS and connectivity improves, Google has to keep up with its mobile search offering. Our MD Simon Penson has written extensively about Google’s improving intelligence and its ability to enhance your search results based on not only your history, but also your circumstance.

The example Simon uses, in the post linked to above, is:

‘The results will be different when I search for something like ‘bingo’ than when you do and that’s because Google wants to understand not just the explicit part of the query (in this case “bingo”), but also the implicit reason for me writing it.

Clearly if Google knows the implicit ‘stuff’ about you it can present a much more useful result and in the example we see above the “bingo” search may bring up bricks-and-mortar bingo halls near Peterborough as opposed to branded online game pages.”

In other words, your circumstance and in particular your location, will begin to change the results you see. It will go further too. If you search for ‘weather this weekend’, Google might check the weather in your area, see that it will be hot, and suggest a search for BBQs or sun tan lotion.

The tip here is to be aware of this shift and how it might affect search results for your brand or competitive terms within your industry. Might a competitor be shown above you because of their relevance to the searcher’s circumstance? And what can you do to combat that?’

3. Mobile domain setup

Is your mobile site on an m. or .mobi domain? If so, ditch it. Now.

Running a single version of your site on one domain/TLD has many benefits, including those mentioned in point 1, and the following:

  • One CMS
  • One payment gateway
  • One domain to build links into
  • One domain to advertise
  • One Adwords account
  • One Webmaster Tools account
  • The list goes on…

4. Algorithm variants

Google has one main algorithm now in the Hummingbird era, however they have variants of it that are used for different types of search, most notably mobile. If you don’t meet the criteria of the mobile algorithm variant, you cannot enjoy its benefits and you will likely suffer in overall rankings as a result.

Responsive design and TLD/domain setup are really key, but clue up on all Google mobile recommendations to ensure you can get the most from mobile search.

Local

5. Local results in SERPs

Whether it’s on mobile or desktop, all of us have undoubtedly noticed the inclusion of local results in SERPs. Similarly to the mobile point above, this is essentially based on your circumstance in a more basic way. You are searching for X and your Google account says you live in Y, so Google will ensure relevant results for X in/near Y will be prioritized.

6. Attracting local traffic safely

Don’t use gateway pages, i.e. pages of no value designed to target specific terms. If you have multiple locations, great. If you don’t, then don’t assume you can piggyback on location search terms just by having a page for it on site.

As Panda has taught us, every page on your site should be unique, authentic and have value.

Use location schema to mark up addresses on your site.

Ensure you link addresses and your site with your Google Plus profile in the correct way to get the best presence in local results and also appear in Google Maps.

Content 

7. Hummingbird

Google’s new algorithm applies understanding of ‘meaning’ to search queries. Essentially, Google is becoming a question answerer rather than a document retriever. For you, this means all your content needs to answer a question, not just fulfill SEO best practice in terms of keywords. Be valuable, be genuine and write for the reader, both on and off page.

8. Citations

Again, our talented MD Simon has written on this subject, specifically about how Google is, or at least will be, starting to look beyond links. Simple mentions of your brand (once you are established as a brand in Google’s eyes – someone has searched for your brand name and clicked on your site) will become more and more important as a ranking factor.

This is worth considering, especially as part of your off-page strategy and especially if you have suffered any link quality penalisations in the past.

Speaking of citations…

9. Social as a ranking factor

One of the biggest grey areas of SEO at present is the real impact social has as a ranking factor. Do mentions of your brand in social contribute to search? Does social audience size add weight to your brand presence in search? Does high social engagement act as a validation for your brand, just like links do?

What is in no doubt is that social contributes to search presence. Whether this be at Facebook page level in terms of engagement rates or at on-site level through shares of your blog or product content, it is something that simply has to be considered. Ensure sharing buttons are present on the site and that your social platforms are well maintained with a focus on engagement.

10. Use your content to answer the questions being asked by searchers

Above, in the ‘Hummingbird’ section, I mentioned how Google is now looking for sites to answer questions. The important part is knowing what those questions are. The tip here is to understand your long tail and ensure that every piece of content you add to static or blog pages on your site is to answer a specific long tail query. Long tail terms by nature convert and engage better, so ensure you supplement your brand and head term traffic by attracting the long tail too…

Long tail

11. Value over vanity
Whether you’re agency or in-house, we’ve all had THAT conversation after a head term has dropped once place, and it’s seemingly the end of the world. In reality, the combined impact of long tail can be as great or even greater than a head term.

So, when setting your 2015 targets and objectives, focus on valuable terms, not vanity terms. Not only can they just as effective in terms of traffic, they can also convert better too.

12. Identify long tail opportunity

I mentioned ‘value’ above, but it is of course essential to understand what is valuable. Use tools and metrics to understand where the value lies in your long tail. Consider factors such as:

  • Search volumes
  • Equivalent CPC (what it would cost you to bid on the term in PPC)

The Holy Grail is, of course, high volume terms with low equivalent CPCs (meaning low competition). These are gold dust, so try to find compromises between volume and competition to ensure you are chasing achievable goals.

The level of competition is the ‘risk’ and the search volume is the ‘reward’. A lower reward term with lower risk is often more valuable than a higher reward term with a higher risk. And of course, as is the nature of long tail, there tends to be more of the former around!

All clients/bosses/heads/seniors want to see their sites rank highly for vanity terms, but if you can prove the opportunity in long tail it can make that conversation a lot easier to crack.

Security

13. Consider switching to https

Google has recently said that using the https protocol is now a ranking factor, following positive results in recent algorithm tests. In their words:

“We’d like to encourage all website owners to switch from http to https to keep everyone on the safe”

This is a huge indicator that https is something all sites should consider. You may already have https in place on parts of your site like login areas and checkouts, but extending that across the whole site may give you a ranking boost now and in the future.

From a user perspective, the comforting padlock symbol in their address bar for their entire experience on your site could also improve conversion for you.

We’ve had two clients make the total switch, with very positive results.

For more on how and why to switch, there’s some great advice from Moz here.

Final tip

14. Unblock CSS and javascript files

Another hint from Google; with recent updates to Webmaster Guidelines advising that you do not block javascript and CSS files moving forwards. In the past, CSS and javascript have been redundant as Google could not read them, but now Google can render these files as part of its crawls. To ensure your crawl is accurate, ensure you do not block javascript and CSS files in robots.txt.

Here’s what Google has to say about the matter:

“Disallowing crawling of Javascript or CSS files in your site’s robots.txt directly harms how well our algorithms render and index your content and can result in suboptimal rankings.”

In other words, block them and you won’t rank as well. Take heed!

Now, it’s time to fish around in the bottom of your bag for that membership card and get down to the gym!

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Social Analytics Hacks to Maximise Content Impact http://www.zazzlemedia.co.uk/blog/social-analytics-hacks-for-content/ http://www.zazzlemedia.co.uk/blog/social-analytics-hacks-for-content/#comments Wed, 31 Dec 2014 12:19:29 +0000 http://www.zazzlemedia.co.uk/?post_type=blog&p=6095 As marketers we are living in unprecedented times. While historically those living, or specializing, in the creative areas of the marketing world have had little need to cozy up to the left-brained ‘data geeks’ those that don’t are now missing out on the opportunity to help shape the future of the industry. Such a statement […]

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As marketers we are living in unprecedented times. While historically those living, or specializing, in the creative areas of the marketing world have had little need to cozy up to the left-brained ‘data geeks’ those that don’t are now missing out on the opportunity to help shape the future of the industry.

Such a statement may seem a little exaggerated but we now live in a world of data and we’re producing it at unprecedented velocity.

According to the latest stats we have created more than 90% of the world’s total data in the last two years alone. That’s nine tenths of the information output since the beginning of time.

What does this mean for marketers?

The ability for marketers to extract that information from the ‘ether’ is improving and nowhere more than from within social media, an industry at the forefront of the big data revolution.

At the most accessible end of this is the recent launch of Analytics for the top social platforms – Twitter, Pinterest and the constantly improving offering from Facebook.

Because we share so much information across social it is a goldmine for audience insight as their loves, hates, interests and emotions are shared consistently for all to see.

How do we access the right data?

It wasn’t so long ago that social analytics only gave you top level data, such as fans numbers, followers and Likes, but things move quickly in social and we are now entering the third generation and an era when we can not only understand who is engaging but what they are engaging with, when and how.

The news that Twitter opened up its analytics platform to all is a welcome one for all marketers that value data validation within their decision making process.

The announcement also came hot on the heels of the news from Pinterest that it has, for the first time, also opened up its vast treasure trove of data to businesses via its new interface.

Access to this kind of information is invaluable for brands and marketers in particular as the key starting point in the creation of truly engaging social content is an understanding of who it is you are trying to target.

Understanding good content strategy

Great content has never focused on what to write, but rather whom you are writing it for and it is in this critical area that Social Analytics can change the world for content and social executives.

Being able to craft content and strategies that engage or influence customer purchases is the difference between success and failure in a social marketing world.

Twitter

The introduction of Twitter Analytics is only the first step in the process of making Twitter more effective for brands. The current dashboard however is still very useful for those understanding the effectiveness of their content.

The interface itself is very user friendly and while the data isn’t parsed as much as a data analyst may like it certainly provide enough insight for an individual or brand to positively affect how their content strategy is pieced together.

The main part of the interface gives you your latest tweets over the last 28 days and bases overall performance on a ‘month-on-month’ basis and as you can see from my personal profile I am underperforming based on last month’s engagement rate:

Tweet Impressions

The breakdown of tweet impressions per day over the last 28 days

What is really interesting about this chart is that not only does it give you impression rates over time but, critically, gives you a view on days of the week also.

This can be really powerful for publication velocity decision making as looking for trends in publication rate V day-of-the-week can help you refine when you publish and what kind of content it may be.

It’s this data that really helps settle the ‘when to post’ argument once and for all as from it you can easily plot key engagement points in the day, week or month and segment that into content types.

To do that you must first download the data in Excel format.

Once downloaded you can then play with this insight, sorting it by either Impressions, Engagement or by individual interactions such as Favorites or Retweets.

But where it gets really interesting is when you start grouping the data into useable insight pots.

For instance, you can splice this data fairly easily to give you a 24hr breakdown to show you when most engagements/interactions take place:

To do that you’ll need to separate the data in the ‘time’ column you can see below:

Downloaded Twitter Data

Downloaded Twitter data looks like this

To do that use the Text to Column function in excel so you end up with something that looks like this:

Twitter Data Time Date

You can separate out date and time using the Text to Column function

By then sorting your time column you can chart impressions, or engagements by time of the day and work out when your potential audience is largest.

To make this data as user friendly as possible however we need to group time and impressions into 30-minute slots, otherwise the data view is extremely complex.

To do that export the Time and Impressions and simply add the number of impressions that sit within every 30 minute slot.

For the 5.30am – 6am group we add the following together:

Twitter Data Time Impressions

Add these impression numbers together and place them into time segments

You can use the following excel formula to do that more easily: =ROUND(A1/(1/24),0)

What you end up with is a chart that looks something like this and as we can see for my personal Twitter account I have three ‘peak’ times of the day when my reach is best.

Chart Twitter Data

You can chart the data to show you the key peaks more easily

You can then look at segmenting content ‘types’ also, either by topic or types (e.g. – image, blog post, video). You can easily do that manually within excel or look to use Conditional Formatting to highlight certain words or phrases, from which you can then sort into color-coded segments.

In the example below I have highlighted all tweets that mentioned ‘content’ in red and used the ‘Sort’ option to pull these to the top of the spreadsheet. On the right hand side you can then also see that I have separated out the date and time so I can then separately analyze when is the best time to tweet specifically about content.

Sort Tweets

Sort your tweets using key words and conditional formatting. This is for tweets that contain ‘content’

It is then simply a case of repeating this process for any other key topics, or content types, as needed to paint a full picture of your content strategy performance.

Most engaging content

With the data in spreadsheet format it is then really easy to sort by most engaging content. To do that you simply sort by the engagement column but you want to ensure that data is not skewed by tweets that have been as part of a conversation you must firstly remove those manually.

As engagement as a metric is defined as the relationship between the number of impressions a tweet gets and the number of interactions (favorites, retweets etc.) then conversational tweets can score highly and will need to be removed to ensure you see a truer picture.

Pinterest

For brands with a strong image-led strategy Pinterest analytics can also be powerful and it gives you the same ability to download the data. It is possible to use the same techniques then to answer those critical What, Where, How, Why questions.

The new data platform has huge potential on first viewing but before you can access any data you must first ensure your account is a business account. Converting it is easy, as you’ll be asked to do so as part of the signing up process.

One additional interesting area is the ‘Interests’ tab within ‘Your Audience’

Pinterest Audience Interests

Your audience Interests is one of the most useful segments of Pinterest Analytics.

Within the section you can find lots of inspiration around ‘other interests’ and this can be extremely powerful as part of the content ideation process that should flow out of the initial audience research and understanding process. An example of the ideas process I use can be found here.

And you can even filter by device type to add extra detail to your content strategy, ensuring that it is fit for a multi-device world. 

Facebook

Third and finally we come to Facebook, the biggest opportunity of them all from a data insight perspective.

As the largest of all the platforms from an audience perspective it offers huge opportunity for those willing to dig into it.

For those looking for easy-to-access data the platform does a good job of providing both good demographic insight and also engagement information through the Page Insights dashboard.

The recently improved section gives you all kinds of information now, including:

  1. How your audience is growing over time.
  2. How you reach is over time
  3. How engaging your content is
  4. A post-by-post breakdown of performance
  5. How well certain types of post are performing
  6. Top posts from competitor Pages you track
  7. A demographic breakdown of those you reach and those you engage with (useful to understand the difference between these two things to improve engagement)

Again, you can easily download post performance data to Excel and use the same process as explained earlier in the post to better understand content trends.

By clicking the Export button within Insights you can then choose Post Data and the date range you wish to analyze and export.

Extra insight

Where things get really interesting, however is in understanding interest sets in a much wider context.

The key to any audience insight work is to paint an accurate picture of those people you want to interact with and, ultimately, convert.

And while the information you will have extracted thus far gives you some great detail around what content works for your audience and when they want to consume there is still a critical component missing – real information on the loves and hates of your customers.

The good news is you can get this kind of information directly from Facebook itself with a little manual hack I have written about previously.

Pulling it together

So by now you should have a host of data to work from. The next step it to turn that into actionable insight from which you can build out your content calendar.

To pull it together I ultimately look to use this content calendar but there is a stage before population that helps you schematically structure your insight to ensure you brainstorm enough of the the right ideas to fit.

This is the matrix I use for recording the initial insight from the data collection exercises discussed in this post and the idea from this point is to take this into your ideation process to ensure you have as many ideas as possible for each area.

Arrange Data

Arranging your data like this makes it easier to create a data-led strategy

If you’ve worked hard at the insight piece you’ll have a much longer list than this and the perfect structure for the start of your audience-centric social content strategy!

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Google Algorithm Updates 2014 http://www.zazzlemedia.co.uk/blog/google-updates-2014/ http://www.zazzlemedia.co.uk/blog/google-updates-2014/#comments Tue, 16 Dec 2014 10:47:56 +0000 http://www.zazzlemedia.co.uk/?post_type=blog&p=6089 Firstly, what a year it’s been – a year in which Google has improved and allowed their algorithms to become more aggressive and proactive in its crawling of websites. This means that more websites than ever are getting intertwined with their updates. With Panda becoming incorporated into the main Google algorithm through ‘soft updates’, this […]

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Firstly, what a year it’s been – a year in which Google has improved and allowed their algorithms to become more aggressive and proactive in its crawling of websites. This means that more websites than ever are getting intertwined with their updates.

With Panda becoming incorporated into the main Google algorithm through ‘soft updates’, this means your website will be analyzed every time Google crawls to assess the quality of content. Whether or not it’s above the fold, potentially duplicated and spammy content will all be taken into account and measured.
They have also started taking the first steps into doing this with Penguin and it will become more and more intertwined with the core algorithm, much like Panda has.

Google is also continuing to tackle spam filled niches, such as payday loans and the gambling/online gaming industries. Cloaking and link network beneficiary websites are still ranking well for highly competitive terms and making a lot of money.

This yearly round up will look at the major updates, what the update contained and useful reading.

February 6th 2014 – Page layout update 3.0

Google has refreshed their page layout algorithm which penalises websites that are delivering a poor user experience by displaying too many ads above the fold. Websites that use this heavy ad approach are interested in one thing, making money from AdSense and third party cost per click facilities.

http://searchengineland.com/google-updates-page-layout-algorithm-go-sites-top-heavy-ads-183929
https://twitter.com/mattcutts/status/432940645200588800

March 24th 2014 – Unnamed update

There were some major fluxes experienced in ‘algorithm flux’ trackers, such as Mozcast – the dates were narrowed down to the 24th and 25th March.

There was a lot of chatter on the Webmaster forums and in the Twittersphere amongst the SEO community about this being the ‘soft’ integration of Panda to the main algorithm.

However, this was never confirmed or denied by Google.

https://www.seroundtable.com/google-update-march-18313.html
http://www.hmtweb.com/marketing-blog/softer-panda-march-2014/

May 16th 2014 – Payday Loan 2.0

The 2.0 version of the Payday Loan algorithm was released just prior to Panda 4.0, but the exact date of its release was hard to pinpoint as the updates were so close to one another. This update was later defined to target specifically spam filled websites, not queries. 

Google released the original Payday Loan algorithm on June 11th 2013 and have since been refining this specific algorithm to try and combat this spam filled niche. It’s an important niche to conquer due to the high volume of searches and money made through this specific niche. Loan sharks via black hat methods are targeting a lot of vulnerable people and it genuinely poses a threat to the everyday Joe looking for a legit payday loan.

http://searchengineland.com/official-google-payday-loan-algorithm-2-0-launched-targets-spammy-queries-192027

May 19th – Panda 4.0 – eBay

A new, more aggressive and integrated Panda 4.0 algorithm was released which positive and negatively affected a lot of websites.

eBay was the standout website that was publically announced as being affected the most by Panda 4.0. This was due to a lot of pages that they had specifically created to target specific keywords – landing pages, effectively.

eBay.co.uk saw a 48.44% drop in search visibility and eBay.com saw a 48.1% drop.

They were created to try and deliver a more user-friendly approach to eBay visitors, but were put live before the necessary content was uploaded to make them Google friendly. You can read more about this here.

eBay have since begun to recover from this and it was determined that this was a ‘manual Panda’ action, which means that Google had seen this and had manually applied the Panda 4.0 algorithm to these pages – this is a very unique case.

http://searchengineland.com/google-begins-rolling-panda-4-0-now-192043
https://twitter.com/mattcutts/status/468891756982185985
https://www.davidnaylor.co.uk/google-confirm-google-panda-4-0-operational-spammy-queries-cleaned.html

June 12th 2014 – Payday Loan 3.0

Matt Cutts announced this update at a SMX Advanced keynote. It was made apparent by Matt that this update was specifically released to target spam filled queries, not websites like the 2.0 update and this is why the updates were so close to one another.

http://searchengineland.com/google-launching-payday-loan-algorithm-3-0-targeting-spammy-queries-week-193821
https://www.seroundtable.com/google-payday-loan-3-spam-18695.html

June 28th 2014 – Authorship profile photos removed

John Mueller, Webmasters trend analyst at Google, surprisingly announced on the 25th June that Google would be dropping all authorship photos from the SERPs. The 28th June was the date that the drop was complete and that rel=”author” markup was made almost completely redundant after heavy promotion of how useful this implementation is for your websites.

We believe that Google are becoming better at understanding for themselves who the influencers are in each niche on the Internet, therefore removing the purpose of rel=”author”.

http://searchengineland.com/google-removes-author-photos-search-mean-195236
http://moz.com/blog/bye-bye-author-pics

July 2nd 2014 – Right to be forgotten

After a EU ruling, Google introduced the ‘Right To Be Forgotten’. This allows users to ask Google to remove irrelevant or outdated information about them when conducting a search query for their name.

However, the implementation and practicality of this has been questioned by many as the results are only removed from your local search engine and are still available in others, whilst completely going against the US first amendment for free speech.

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/technology-27631001
http://www.telegraph.co.uk/technology/google/11036257/Telegraph-stories-affected-by-EU-right-to-be-forgotten.html

July 14th 2014 – Modern devices update

Google began to promote modern websites that displayed content using up to date methods that were both more user and search engine friendly. I’m sure this would have caused massive rifts amongst large corporations that hadn’t updated their website practices and as a consequence dropped in the rankings over night.

Warnings in the search results are displayed on URLs that are using out of date methods, which will deter users from clicking through to the website.

http://googlewebmastercentral.blogspot.co.uk/2014/07/promoting-modern-websites-for-modern.html

July 24th 2014 – Pigeon/Local search update

Pigeon was a further update from Venice and other smaller updates as to how Google Local is presented and identified. This update brought the local and core algorithm closer together to display better local results for related search queries and in turn, altered a lot of local results.

http://searchengineland.com/google-makes-significant-changes-local-search-ranking-algorithm-197778
http://blumenthals.com/blog/2014/07/25/google-updates-local-algo-with-more-web-based-signals-turmoil-in-serps/

August 6th 2014 – HTTPS as a ranking signal

Google further backed their support for websites that encrypt their data by publically announcing that websites who sit behind a HTTPS/SSL certificate will receive a small ranking boost.

We have since moved a few websites across to HTTPS and have seen only minimal increments, if any at all. However, Google has said that the signal will start out on a small scale and increase if the change proved a positive one.

One thing to be aware of if you’re planning on moving to HTTPS is to ensure that you strictly follow Google’s guide (see below) and ensure that you have all the appropriate HTTPS tracking profiles on Webmaster Tools, otherwise you won’t be able to see how Google’s data on your website.

http://googlewebmastercentral.blogspot.co.uk/2014/08/https-as-ranking-signal.html
http://searchengineland.com/google-starts-giving-ranking-boost-secure-httpsssl-sites-199446

August 8th 2014 – Mini Panda or SSL

There was chatter amongst webmasters and the SEO community about either a small SSL update or mini panda as ranking fluxes was witnessed. However, Google did not confirm or deny this speculation.

http://searchengineland.com/google-comment-possible-google-algorithm-update-weekend-200179

August 28th 2014 – Authorship removed

After the update on the 28th June that removed authorship photos, Google announced that authorship is to be completely removed – it will no longer be processed or read by Google.

By the 29th August, all authorship bylines, for example ‘by James Perrott’ had been completely removed by Google.

September 23rd 2014 – Panda 4.1

Panda 4.1 was announced to include an algorithmic component, which further intertwined the analysis of content structure, quality and potential duplication as part of the main ranking algorithm.

Google announced that it would be a ‘slow rollout’, which made the exact timing of this update a mystery, but it was estimated that between 3-5% of all queries were affected.

http://searchengineland.com/panda-update-rolling-204313
http://www.hmtweb.com/marketing-blog/panda-4-1-analysis/
https://plus.google.com/app/basic/stream/z13wtrti4umeg11t522de5qjkqyuingt3

October 17th 2014 – Penguin 3.0

The one that everyone had been waiting for… Penguin 3.0 finally arrived!

After more than a year since Penguin 2.1, Google publically announced that the latest Penguin algorithm had been released after several weeks of suspense. The update was much smaller and had less impact than everyone was anticipating as only <1% of US/English queries were affected.

This update was seen at the beginning to only really impact google.com and websites that reside in the US. However, it soon became clear that this update was a very slow, worldwide rollout as everyone began to see movement across the globe. This was the long anticipated wait that a lot of webmasters that had been waiting for to allow their websites and businesses to recover from the first penguin update.

https://plus.google.com/app/basic/stream/z13xw14r3y35dzg4004cd5cqty2vvduhn4g
https://www.seroundtable.com/google-penguin-3-impact-roll-19321.html
http://www.hmtweb.com/marketing-blog/penguin-3-analysis-findings/

October 21st 2014 – Pirate

Google fought the illegal downloading website niches before, more than two years ago, in August 2012.

Since the original update, there has been a lot of press about piracy firms being seized by the US government, such as megaupload. This is a battle that will happen for as long as the Internet is alive, but Google are now doing their bit to aid the industry that is suffering because of illegal downloads.

This update further combatted the software and digital media piracy niche, which caused huge drops for a lot of hugely popular illegal download websites.

http://blog.searchmetrics.com/us/2014/10/26/google-pirate-update-analysis-and-loser-list/
http://torrentfreak.com/googles-new-downranking-hits-pirate-sites-hard-141023/

November 28th 2014 – Penguin 3.0 still rolling out…

Over Thanksgiving there was a lot of discussion about further fluctuations in the rankings with people within the community witnessing website recoveries.

Google did confirm that this was Penguin 3.0 still rolling out. There is no end date for this rollout and we’re continuing to see movement on websites via this algorithm.

https://www.davidnaylor.co.uk/thanksgiving-fluctuations-confirmed-penguin-3-0-still-rolling.html

Summary

We certainly saw a large number of algorithm updates in 2014 and some have stemmed from public media pressure and government initiatives, such as the DMCA piracy update, payday loan and the right to be forgotten – all good updates. We’ve also seen Panda and Penguin become more aggressive and integrated with the main Google ranking algorithm. The main advancement of Penguin 3.0 was the ability to target specific pages within a website that has used underhand tactics to acquire links to manipulate Google’s search rankings.

Other useful updates and tools announced by Google are below, check them out:

http://searchengineland.com/googles-news-listings-beyond-traditional-205213
http://searchengineland.com/google-officially-launches-webmaster-tools-international-targeting-196559
http://searchengineland.com/google-quietly-updates-international-targeting-hreflang-webmaster-tools-reporting-209699
http://googlewebmastercentral.blogspot.co.uk/2014/10/tracking-mobile-usability-in-webmaster.html
http://googlewebmastercentral.blogspot.co.uk/2014/11/helping-users-find-mobile-friendly-pages.html
https://www.google.com/webmasters/tools/mobile-friendly/

Predictions for 2015

I believe we’re going to see more of these updates again next year. Panda and Penguin will become part of the core ranking algorithm and Penguin will become more aggressive, but easier to recover from, as it’ll crawl your website more frequently.

The introduction of the mobile friendly tool indicates that Google are taking mobile much more seriously. This has already been proven by the introduction of the ‘mobile friendly’ tags on mobile search tags. Ensuring your website is mobile friendly has to be a major priority when optimizing your current website and looking at re-launching your site in the future.

‘Good links’ are becoming more and more difficult to determine due to the high number of metrics that make up a link; anchor text, placement, quality of website, context, relevancy, trust, equity etc. The world of guest posting will become smaller in 2015, with Digital PR firmly taking its place.

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We Made the List – Top 100 Agencies Revealed http://www.zazzlemedia.co.uk/blog/rar-top-100-agencies/ http://www.zazzlemedia.co.uk/blog/rar-top-100-agencies/#comments Wed, 10 Dec 2014 16:46:33 +0000 http://www.zazzlemedia.co.uk/?post_type=blog&p=6080 Team Zazzle’s hard work and commitment to client performance has this week been rewarded as the business was named in the Top 100 Agencies outside London. The annual list scores the UK’s marketing agencies against a number of tough metrics including client recommendation and satisfaction and financial growth and has placed Zazzle Media in 58th […]

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Team Zazzle’s hard work and commitment to client performance has this week been rewarded as the business was named in the Top 100 Agencies outside London.

The annual list scores the UK’s marketing agencies against a number of tough metrics including client recommendation and satisfaction and financial growth and has placed Zazzle Media in 58th position at our very first attempt.

Zazzle founder and MD Simon Penson said of the news: “It’s a genuinely proud moment for everyone here. The team have worked so hard this year to deliver for each and every one of our clients and this is just reward for that passion and effort. Hats off to every single member of the team!”

“Thank you also to each one of our clients who were contacted to leave feedback. It’s great to know we are doing a good job!”

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How to Set Up for Multi-lingual Content Success http://www.zazzlemedia.co.uk/blog/multi-lingual-seo-set-up/ http://www.zazzlemedia.co.uk/blog/multi-lingual-seo-set-up/#comments Thu, 04 Dec 2014 12:53:10 +0000 http://www.zazzlemedia.co.uk/?post_type=blog&p=6075 Running your business in multiple countries comes with its own headaches. There is a whole level of complexity that comes from an SEO point of view – get it right and your business will flourish. Get it wrong, on the other hand, and it could go all terribly wrong. Often businesses see multilingual SEO as […]

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Running your business in multiple countries comes with its own headaches. There is a whole level of complexity that comes from an SEO point of view – get it right and your business will flourish. Get it wrong, on the other hand, and it could go all terribly wrong.

Often businesses see multilingual SEO as a complex process primarily because of the amount of variables at play. By the time you’ve finished reading this, we hope to change your view by making the best practices for your current multilingual set up clear. To make it easier to follow we’ve divided the article into three sections. First of all we will cover the theory. We’ll then look at how to implement the campaign. Finally we’ll cover the common mistakes that you will need to be aware of – avoid these and you’ll increase the chances of your campaign being a success.

Language v Location

Whenever a larger business is operating in multiple markets they often get confused as to whether to structure their site based upon language or based on the country the site is targeting. There is a simple rule to follow in regards to how to structure your site and it goes as follows:

If your site is targeting readers then structure your site round language. However if your website’s aim is simply to sell then you need to structure your site dependent on countries.

The main reason for this is currency. Just because a country speaks English, it doesn’t mean they will pay in US dollars; similarly, if they speak French the user won’t necessarily pay in Euros. By structuring the site to target the correct country this means you can target the correct currency.

You can also cater for countries which speak more than one language (e.g Canada, which is populated by American and French speakers) by creating different language variants for the individual country. Apple are a great example on how to do this correctly with URLs for https://www.apple.com/ca/ and https://www.apple.com/ca/fr/

Multi Domain Strategy

If you look at the likes of Amazon they operate a multiple domain strategy. These means they use a local ccTLD (a Country Code Top Level Domain) – for example amazon.co.uk to target that market. So for every country they have a separate domain.

One of the biggest benefits to running this setup is that local ccTLD are easier to rank in their target country. They also never get in a situation where two international ccTLD compete in the same market; for example the .fr ranking in Google UK. It is also far easier to control the anchor text profile for country-by-country bases.

Your business may already have this setup and to carry this on may seem like the obvious choice. However, it’s not that simple and there are potential issues to consider.

Firstly, there is the complexity of running, operating and maintaining so many different websites. It is very difficult to ensure all the multiple sites in your group implement the same system – companies will often have developers situated in each of the countries, running independent teams. Not only does this incur extra cost from a staffing point of view it would probably require a separate SEO agency for every website.

Breaking into new markets would also be difficult. It means you will have to start off with a completely brand new domain name without any history. You would have to work very hard building links and earning your place in Google for that specific country.

There is also the added problem that your domain name isn’t available in your targeted country. This could prove expensive to buy or result in a lengthy legal process in order to obtain the domain.

Sub Domain Strategy

When we talk about a sub domain strategy it is the halfway point between a multi domain and single domain strategy. Like any compromise you are often left in a situation where you’re missing the best benefits from the other strategies.

In terms of cost, sub domains are cheaper to implement than a multi domain strategy. You would never have to worry about your domain name being free because you control the domain. There would be no benefit for Geo targeting like we get in using local ccTLDs. It would also mean that every new sub domain you launch would start off with no authority because Google treats sub domains as brand new sites.

Sub Domains are best suited to target different languages because local ccTLDs target countries and not languages. A good example would be Wikipedia, which uses sub domains like the following:

http://en.wikipedia.org/

If your business is an e-commerce enterprise and is currently using the sub domain setup then we would recommend moving over to a single root domain strategy. We have handled this for many of our clients and even though it’s a complicated process, if done correctly it can be very lucrative. You may also want to go a multi domain strategy: however this would involve a lot of work and would also increase costs.

Single Domain Strategy

An alternative to both multi domain and sub domain strategy is using a single domain. This is a strategy that Red Bull uses with its site http://www.redbull.com/ in which it targets each country using separate sub domains. For example, in the UK it’s http://www.redbull.com/uk/en

One of the main benefits from running a site on a single domain means that the link juice is spread throughout the domain. This means you could set up a new section of the site to target a new country and benefit from the juice in the root domain. It will also bring the entire link juice from all the other sites back onto the single domain, boosting its power further. It is also easier to maintain consistency across the whole domain, which will be fit for purpose in regard to SEO.

In terms of costs these would also be reduced as you would only need a single SEO agency and also because the development could be carried out centrally. Also the additional costs of SSL certificates would be greatly reduced by not having to purchase one for each country.

If you have been, or are practicing, dangerous link building processes you could be in a risky position though. Getting a penalty on the domain would affect the entire domain, which could in turn then affect all of the countries. It is also difficult to maintain the anchor text profile when you have separate marketing campaigns operating in separate counties.

Implementing Hreflang Strategy

There is some code that we can put on your site no matter whether you are running a sub domain, multi domain or single domain. The code is called hreflang, which is additional code you need to put on to every page on the site.

The code instructs Google and other search engines what language the page is targeting, and more importantly, the alternative language pages are.

The code looks like the following:

<link rel=”alternate” href=”http://example.com/en” hreflang=”language-country” />

As an example, if we were implementing hreflang code on a fictional site called Zazzle Phones for its iPhone page in the UK:

In the source code on: http://www.zazzlephone.com/uk/iphone/

You would need to put the following code within the <head> tags:

<link rel=”alternate” href=”http://www.zazzlephones.com/uk/iphone/” hreflang=”en-GB” />
<link rel=”alternate” href=”http://www.zazzlephones.com/it/iphone/” hreflang=”it-IT” />
<link rel=”alternate” href=”http://www.zazzlephones.com/ie/iphone/” hreflang=”en-IE” />
<link rel=”alternate” href=”http://www.zazzlephones.com/de/iphone/” hreflang=”de-DE” />
<link rel=”alternate” href=”http://www.zazzlephones.com/fr/iphone/” hreflang=”fr-FR” />

What the code above does is specify the country and the language the page is targeting along with a range of relevant alternatives. This code needs to go on to every page one of each site that has an alternative version in a different language/country. If the site was set up on a multi domain strategy the code for the iPhone page would look like the following:

<link rel=”alternate” href=”http://www.zazzlephones.co.uk/iphone/” hreflang=”en-GB” />
<link rel=”alternate” href=”http://www.zazzlephones.it/iphone/” hreflang=”it-IT” />
<link rel=”alternate” href=”http://www.zazzlephones.ie/iphone/” hreflang=”en-IE” />
<link rel=”alternate” href=”http://www.zazzlephones.de/iphone/” hreflang=”de-DE” />
<link rel=”alternate” href=”http://www.zazzlephones.fr/iphone/” hreflang=”fr-FR” />

In the site was set up on a sub domain strategy the code for the site would look like the following:

<link rel=”alternate” href=”http://uk.zazzlephones.com/iphone/” hreflang=”en-GB” />
<link rel=”alternate” href=”http://it.zazzlephones.com/iphone/” hreflang=”it-IT” />
<link rel=”alternate” href=”http://ie.zazzlephones.com/iphone/” hreflang=”en-IE” />
<link rel=”alternate” href=”http://de.zazzlephones.com/iphone/” hreflang=”de-DE” />
<link rel=”alternate” href=”http://fr.zazzlephones.com/iphone/” hreflang=”fr-FR” />

IP Addresses

There has often been talk about whether having the site hosted in the targeted country is a ranking factor. In the past it was widely regarded that hosting did make an impact. However, with the introduction of cloud computing we believe that there is no benefit in where your site is located.

Instead we encourage our clients to use a content delivery network. Page speed is a primary focus and the quicker your site loads in all countries the better for everyone.

Common Issues

One of the biggest issues with single domain and sub domain strategies is using a ccTLD to implement it. For example, trying to implement these strategies on the main Zazzle domain would be wrong:

www.zazzlemedia.co.uk

Ideally we would need the .com version, which is currently owned by someone else.

Alternatives could be .org, .net or any other non-geographical domain ending – however, .com is often the preferred international domain.

Always check Google webmaster tools to check if the hreflang is set up correctly. It will highlight any issues that are occurring as well as suggesting fixes that need to be implemented.

Conclusion

Getting the foundations right is critical to the success of your campaign. Ultimately it’s best to implement the strategy that best fits your business. Often this needs to align to your current set up. Each method has it drawbacks but with any problem there is often a reward for overcoming it.

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Content Confab & Careers > An Interview With Kristina Halvorson http://www.zazzlemedia.co.uk/blog/kristina-halvorson-interview/ http://www.zazzlemedia.co.uk/blog/kristina-halvorson-interview/#comments Thu, 27 Nov 2014 14:44:32 +0000 http://www.zazzlemedia.co.uk/?post_type=blog&p=6047 Kristina Halvorson is a revered figure in the content strategy space. She’s also one of the most effervescent, passionate and friendly people you are likely to meet and for us that’s a killer combination. We caught up with her as part of our ongoing Big Interview series to talk career, content and thought leadership as […]

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Kristina Halvorson is a revered figure in the content strategy space. She’s also one of the most effervescent, passionate and friendly people you are likely to meet and for us that’s a killer combination. We caught up with her as part of our ongoing Big Interview series to talk career, content and thought leadership as she plots the next Confab, the first U.S. conference dedicated to the topic of content strategy.

Below the Minnesota-based content expert opens up about everything from her own mentors and childhood to the secret of what makes great content. Read on and prepare to be inspired…

Q – Tell us a little about yourself

I started out as a copywriter in the late 90s, and decided early onto focus on websites, and became really intrigued and engaged by how differently people interacted with media online when people were still trying to get their heads around it all. So I worked on several large scale website projects, hiring my first employee in 2005 and becoming a small agency in 2008.

I realised that I had graduated from sorting out content requirements to taking on more of a consulting role. I didn’t know what to call my role so I put on my business card interactive content strategist, which I thought I had made up. But in December 2007 I came across an article by Rachel Lovinger named ‘Content Strategy: The Philosophy of Data’. I thought: “It’s the thing I do!”

I searched for content strategy and there were fewer than 8,000 results, which was disheartening. So I knew I needed to gather information from the very few people I could find who practiced it, and found 15 or so individuals. In 2009 I helped facilitate the very first content strategy consortium. There were 20 of us and several were folks who became leaders in the ‘conversation’, such as Samantha Starmer, Rachel Lovinger, Karen McGrane, and Margo Bloomstein.

Shortly after that I shifted our focus from web writing to content. No-one knew what that was, and as we went to local clients and introduced that service one by one they all dropped off! But I started gaining national attention. I published the first book on the traffic and looked for speaking opportunities.

We now have a wonderful community of clients, most of them Fortune 500s, and we’ve settled into content strategy for website and web redesign. It was exciting times, and it continues to be so.

Q – Before all this, what did you want to be when you grew up?

I never had a specific career path. I’ve always subscribed to the theory of doing something you love and when that stops do something else. I majored in Theatre which has served me well in public speaking.

I worked in a small cell phone dealership when they were the size of bricks for a few years. Then I did PR, comms, and a little bit of everything in my 20s. I was laid off just after 9/11 when everyone thought the economy was going to collapse. So I decided to put my toe into freelance copywriting.

Q – If you could have dinner with 3 famous people who would they be, and why?

Katharine Hepburn because she has been a kind of role model, a badass who didn’t care what anybody thought in her career. I really admired her principles and how she aged in the industry.

Peter Drucker, one of the big thinkers in the world of strategy at business level. His teachings have had a big impact on how I think about content strategy.

And Shakespeare!

Q – Have you ever had any mentors? Who’s the best content person you have ever worked with and why. And who’s your content crush?

There are folks that supported me and I might contact them during a career crisis. Jared Spool is one – a newsability consultant and a leader in the field of creating solid experiences for users.

Another is Lou Rosenfeld who wrote the book on information architecture. Jeffrey Zeldman has been an influence and provided me with a ton of opportunities. One of the people I go back to is a guy named Tom McCullough who I worked with at the cellphone company who is always supportive. He taught me about entrepreneurship, and was always enthusiastic and honest with clients. A lot of his values have translated to the work I do. I’ve also had good friends and support along the way.

I strive to be a role model; it’s still a nascent industry and I want everyone who does the work to blog and speak and I do my best to spread the word. I do my best to answer every email I get.

Q – Are you working on any new books right now?

I’m starting work on two books. One is a book on practitioners going back to the roots of where good content comes from.

The second is my ‘big scary book’. My roots are in website creation and planning and web content development, but this will be directed at the marketing industry, digging into the myths and helping people understand the realities of content marketing. It’s a big book and I’m terrified (laughs) but looking forward to announcing that next year.

Q – Confab has been a big success story – what’s been the secret to that?

It debuted in 2011 and we’ve sold out our central conference every year. The earlier conferences were a similar experience to what we had at the consortium. Hundreds of people showed up and were like: ‘These people do what I do, I’ve never met anyone else that does!”

It’s still an extraordinary community-building experience and accommodating to the folks that come. We’ve seen that the desires and needs of our audiences are shifting which means that we’ve had to do some hard thinking about offerings because the number one thing, as well as new voices, is advanced material.

Everyone now knows that content is important and we’re digging in to explore how it has a larger impact on organisations and infrastructure, and where the evolving opportunities are. We’ll soon be announcing a new event that we’re hosting next year that will cater for folks looking for more advanced information for content strategy.

Q – What is your biggest day to day frustration?

Content marketing!

No matter how much lip service we pay as leaders in the field I think that the underlying message seems to be that you need to get more content to more people in more places. That’s having a detrimental effect on clients’ return on investment, and frankly their employees’ states of mind, and creating more silos across organisations.

As marketers for 15-20 years we’ve been saying that it’s all about the user, and we need to get content that the user cares about, but so many decisions organisations make are fuelled not by personal careful research and feedback, but much more about what’s the new shiny thing to work on and what other companies are doing or spending money on. They’re asking: “How can we be the Red Bull, or get the next Oreo tweet?” I think that ultimately it will collapse in on itself.

I did an exercise I made a list of all the brands I came into contact with in the first half an hour of my day, from sheets to pyjamas to cereal. There were 150. All of them except for three are on Twitter, and I thought -why the hell would I want to follow a toothpaste company on Twitter?

That’s a financial commitment they’ve made to sink money into these sites, but how are they measuring return? Right now they’re measuring on clicks and eyeballs and reach, and I just think it’s inefficient and making companies crazy.

Q – How do you identify what a client actually needs VS what they think they need?

Great question. More clients are saying they need a content strategy to take them to ‘content Nirvana’. I’ve had to start pushing back and say that marketing strategy is never finished, it evolves, and that’s how I’ve started to see content strategy.

We’ve seen huge RFPs that touch every part of an organisation. I explain that there are a lot of questions that need answers, and information that needs synthesising across silos, before we can establish a strategy to build up over time. Sometimes clients are like “great”, other times they’re like “Woah – this gigantic consultancy agency elsewhere say they can fix it all”.

Six months later they come back and say: “We’ve paid for $500,000 of work for this agency and we can’t implement any of it because they want us to do everything at once which doesn’t work with our infrastructure and culture, and we’ve had had shifts in leadership.” So that’s the mind shift I have to help them undergo.

Q – What qualities make a good content strategist?

You have to know how to listen to clients and challenge their assumptions. Be able to synthesise input from across a variety of sources. It’s not just competitive review, content audit, the next shiny thing, or just executive mandate. It’s bits and pieces of all of that pulled together that will inform a smart actionable strategy.

Q – How will the rapid ascent of digital marketing influence traditional channels?

Organisations aren’t set up to deal with it. They’re bogged down with how they’ve hired in the past, and a lot aren’t sure where the ‘website teams’ should sit. Scott Brinker talks about the bridge between marketing and technology and I think those lines are blurring, which is a huge challenge because priorities are very different on both sides. That translates to dilution of brand and losing track of quality.

Ultimately customers don’t care where they find you, you’re all the same to them, and if you’ve got one brand happening in your packaging and a totally different one on your marketing site that’s a problem.

Q – What advice would you give yourself, if you had to start your career all over again?

Don’t ever step away from work.

I felt I did that when I was on a run of speaking and writing and I left the work and business in the hands of other people. I stepped so far away that I lost touch with what was important and core challenges, and was relying on second-hand information form audiences and staff. That was a mistake.

It’s difficult to balance everything from client work, and writing and speaking to parenting and friendships, that has to take priority if you’re to have real valid true insights into how things are evolving in the industry.

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The Simple Guide to Competitive Auditing http://www.zazzlemedia.co.uk/blog/competitive-auditing/ http://www.zazzlemedia.co.uk/blog/competitive-auditing/#comments Mon, 24 Nov 2014 09:05:12 +0000 http://www.zazzlemedia.co.uk/?post_type=blog&p=6025 Auditing your competitors can be a very powerful strategy to gain more knowledge on your industry and what it takes to win. To do that successfully requires a data-led approach and that starts with defining your competition before then really diving into their own data trail so you can reverse engineer the strategy that may […]

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Auditing your competitors can be a very powerful strategy to gain more knowledge on your industry and what it takes to win.

To do that successfully requires a data-led approach and that starts with defining your competition before then really diving into their own data trail so you can reverse engineer the strategy that may be powering their success

In this post we are going to share with you how to discover your ideal competitors, and how you can find important data to capitalise on.

*Note: throughout the post we are going to be using: footasylum.com as an example, as at the time of searching for the keyword we wanted to focus on, it was near the bottom of page one in Google. Which is an ideal place to see what the competition above you are doing better.

Finding Your Competition

First of all you need to identify what keywords you want to compete for. So let’s say for example, FootAsylum wants to focus on the keyword “mens trainers” which has around 22,000 average monthly organic searches. You can use the idea tab on the Google’s keyword planner tool to find more targeted terms.

keyword research

Once, you have a keyword, or a selection of keywords, you can begin finding your competitors. One way to do this is by performing a simple incognito search, which will provide you with the top three competitors, from there you can start to see who you are up against. However this could turn out to be a lengthy process if you are going to be focusing on a lot of keywords. Which is why we suggest you use the following method.

footasylum rankingsThe better & faster way to determine your competitors is by using SEMrush. Put your website in the top bar, then click on organic research > competitors on the left. This will give you a list of organic competitors that are competing for the same sort of key phrases you are.

finding competitors

Both sets of data has allow us to identify the two main competitors for footasylum.com.

  • JDSports.co.uk
  • Schuh.co.uk

Of course you could expand your competitor range further, but we are just giving you a clear example on a few so this post doesn’t get too data heavy.

The next step is to then get an overview of where you stand against your competitors, and where you need to improve to compete with them organically.

First of all you should compare the main onsite factors, such as title tags, content, h1 tags and meta descriptions, make sure they are inline with Google Guidelines.

One of the best ways of getting a good idea of what you’re competing against is by doing a “site:domain.com” search, to see how big your competitors really are organically. This allows you to see how many pages have been indexed by Google. However don’t feel disheartened if your competitors have much more content than you, as it is all about the quality of it along with the SEO on-site factors. Not to mention the other huge part of the equation is links, which will we go into further detail shortly.

sitewide searches

Finding where competitors traffic comes from

The next step in the process is to then work out just where their traffic is coming from. One of the best tools for doing this is undoubtedly SearchMetrics as it allows you to compare domains on their organic search visibility. When comparing Footasylum.com solely on organic visibility to its competitors we can see despite the lack of content, overall they are playing a decent game and are certainly worthy of further investigation.

searchmetrics foot asylum

SEMrush then adds further data by comparing where you stand organically with all your keywords. Click on organic research > positions and you will be able to get a rough estimate of your competitors traffic.

semrush

By far the most useful element of the tool’s data set, however is that it gives you keyword data in a way that allows you to relate it to the relative traffic those positions are driving to the site. Brand terms skew this but you can easily filter this out and grab the generic terms you are really after and export.

From this data you can produce a document which shows all of the keyword data (we have attached the example) Which shows all the keywords, the average monthly search volume along with the positions and ranking URL.

competitors-traffic-3

Analysing Traffic Data

The next step is to get all of the URLs of the competitors you got from the previous data, then running them through URL Profiler, selecting the below options.  This will give you Majestic link data along with all the social share data for each URL and a host of other comparisons, such as readability and more.

analyising-traffic-data-1

To make this extra useful you can run the same report for your site and the top five positions for the keyword you are targeting and then highlight any data points that the top five share but perhaps your site doesn’t. For instance, it may be that your text/html ratio is too low and that can tell you that you need to add further content to the page in order to compete.

By this point we have narrowed down the initial 60,000 URL’s to the top 300 that have the most authority and social shares. From this data we can see potential pages you could create, and it gives you content ideas based on what we know to have been shared socially. (this is also in the example document)

analyising-traffic-data-2

Obviously the data above will give you a good idea of what content to create, however the next step is to compare the value of links between competitors using Majestic. For a deep analysis on your competitors you could just use all the data you got from URL profiler, and filter out anything below 20 trustflow for example.

Reverse Engineer Their Off Page Strategies

For quick wins, you should focus on the organic keyword landing pages you want to compete for. You can do this by using the compare option on Majestic, as you can see below, we have compared the landing pages for each domain for the keyword “mens trainers” which we searched for at the beginning.

off-page-strategies-1

From this data we can see “JD Sports” and “Schuh” have a much higher trust flow on their ranking landing pages when compared to FootAsylum, which explains, in part, why they are ranking higher organically for the keyword “mens trainers”.

Now comes the fun part. Piecing all of this data together, we can see that the main reason FootAsylum is not performing as well as it could, is due to the lack of trustworthy and authoritative links. However overall in terms of keywords rankings, FootAsylum are doing a lot better than its competitors, but how is this possible?

After further investigation via Searchmetrics, FootAsylum have taken the more targeted approach of gaining most of their rankings via long tail on product specific keywords rather than the vanity terms.

off-page-strategies-2

However if FootAsylum improved their top level categories, by building more authoritative links this would help increase trust flow throughout their site, which would massively help them compete for those larger terms also.

Links

We can investigate a total of 84 targeted domains from our earlier comparison on Majestic. As the domain is linking to a competitor, the likelihood of them linking to you if you ask them is high. Especially as we have compared it by landing page basis, meaning it is highly relevant. Just from a quick glance, we have highlighted a few opportunities, they could also build relationships with.

http://www.thegoodwebguide.co.uk/ (PR 5 Homepage, 48 Domain Trust)

http://www.newkicksontheblog.com/ (PR 2 Homepage, 16 Domain Trust)

http://www.sneakerfreaker.com/ (PR 4 Homepage, 56 Domain Trust)

Ahrefs

One other great tool to use is Ahrefs, especially with the introduction of the lost links tab. Sneakily we use this occasionally to  pick up dropped competitor links for out own clients. As you can see from the screenshot, there are a total of 840 lost backlinks for JD Sports, which you can investigate and begin contacting by exporting the list.

off-page-strategies-3

You can also compare your overall referring domains and referring pages.

off-page-strategies-4

We can see FootAsylum competitors are considerably ahead in referring domains and referring pages, which shows they need to improve link building strategy.

The latest new links dashboard also gives you some great insight and often you can spot link building campaigns through the snippets section. Often you will seem themes around things like competitions or blogger offers or reviews and you can simply take this idea as one to work on for your own client.

Social Sharing Analysis

Finally If you’re struggling for content ideas, Buzzsumo is a great tool. Search for a keyword you want to write about, and it will show you content that has performed well on social media. This will give you some ideas on what works well within the industry.

social-sharing-analysis-1

You can also search by domain to look for content ideas of what your competitors are doing, similar to what we did with URL profiler. So you could use this data to find content that has performed well for them and make it better or more up to date, to gain more shares.

Conclusion

  1. Use Google Search & SEMrush to find your competitors. Get a quick overview of your competitor by doing a “site:domain.com” search to see how many pages are indexed in Google.
  1. Compare domains in Searchmetrics to gain where you stand against your competitors organically. Then use SEMrush to get all of your competitors top 20 organic ranking keywords & urls.
  1. Run all of the URLs through URL Profiler, getting majestic metrics & total social shares, filter out the top 300 results from each. Then from this data you can see opportunities to create new content that performs well .
  1. For quick wins, you should run your competing competitors URL into Majestic, this will allow you to see all the links pointing to that page, which you can contact to gain links.
  1. Export broken links from your competitors in Ahrefs. This will allow you to gain link equity where your competitors have lost it. Also compare domains to see how many referring domains they have more than you, so you have a target to aim towards.
  1. Find more social opportunities using Buzzsumo. Search for a keyword or domain to find top performing content, from this you can see what performs well and improve it.

Thank you for your time spent reading this post, I hope you have learned a few things, please leave a comment with any questions.

If you would like to get a copy of the completed competitor research document mentioned in the post then get in touch and we will send you a free copy!

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Data-Driven Content Ideation eBook Launch http://www.zazzlemedia.co.uk/blog/content-idea-ebook-launch/ http://www.zazzlemedia.co.uk/blog/content-idea-ebook-launch/#comments Fri, 14 Nov 2014 13:20:18 +0000 http://www.zazzlemedia.co.uk/?post_type=blog&p=6011 Do you feel somewhat overwhelmed at the prospect of creating amazing digital content? Don’t be embarrassed: it’s not an uncommon response! After all, whilst there really is a science behind having a content driven approach to marketing, it can still feel somewhat inaccessible – especially if you don’t know where to start. But fear not […]

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Do you feel somewhat overwhelmed at the prospect of creating amazing digital content? Don’t be embarrassed: it’s not an uncommon response! After all, whilst there really is a science behind having a content driven approach to marketing, it can still feel somewhat inaccessible – especially if you don’t know where to start.

But fear not because salvation has arrived, in the form of our latest free ebook, entitled The Science of Great Content Ideas’

But let’s not beat around the bush, the internet is already crammed full of useless, pointless and, largely ineffective content without either you – or indeed us – adding to it.

So, how do you ensure that our content isn’t going to become one of those meaningless pieces of work, sitting in total neglect – without an audience – on the world wide web? Well, in principle, that bit is easy; in its most rudimentary state your content needs to provide valuable, useful information for the audience and it needs to be outreached or positioned in a place where your target demographic are going to see and, therefore, access it.

Of course we, as well as anyone, know that coming up with an idea for a piece of content is much easier said than done. We’ve spent countless hours adjusting, deliberating and refining our creative processes to ensure that we’re delivering our strongest ideas for client approval.

The result is our famed content ideation process and the ebook we are launching today walks you through that in detail, allowing you to follow the same guidelines for your own content strategy.

Download ‘The Science of Great Digital Content Ideas’ here or click on the button below to access the content.

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